Patrick Quinn

Twitter

Thirty-seven year-old Patrick Quinn has been fighting the disease in many ways. The co-founder of the Ice Bucket Challenge which raised over 220 million dollars for ALS research has now lost his own fight with the illness.


Diagnosed in 2013, Quinn did not back down form the fight for himself- or others. ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease is a motor neuron disease which slows the functions of the body. There is no known cure for the illness, but Quinn's life has brought scientists closer to one.

Patrick Quinn co-created the viral Ice Bucket Challenge which encouraged online users to upload videos of themselves pouring large amounts of ice water onto their bodies. The challenge was said to simulate the numbing sensation ALS patients feel as a side affect of the illness.

The participants would then tag three other friends to take part in the challenge and donate to ALS research.

The campaign went on to be one of the most successful in the history of social media and raised over 220 million dollars to research and fight ALS.

On Sunday, Patrick Quinn passed away after seven years battling the disease.

The ALS Association shared the devastating news to twitter:

Though Patrick Quinn may no longer be with us, he continues to fight for a cure through his contribution through the groundbreaking campaign.

For information on how to donate to ALS research, visit the ALS Association HERE.

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